ART LAW

Art Law is a fascinating field of law. You would be amazed how many issues get intertwined to solve certain cases: religion, history, moral considerations, traditions, not even talking about all the various legal acts. Sometimes you have so much different aspects to take into account that you don’t even know where to start. Likewise, lots of art related cases are actually so complex that they resemble the skilfully plotted detective story, rather than real life happenings.

My best friend – Irina Olevska – who is a Latvian Attorney-at-law specialized in Art law, has recently launched a great platform which aims to unite professionals interested in Art in all its variety. Already now there are lots of interesting articles and numerous useful pieces of information on Art law put together. However, I am convinced that step-by-step the platform will become one of the best sources on art-related questions interesting both for legal professionals and for specialists in cultural heritage field, art market, connoisseurs and just art admirers.

I am delighted to add my small contribution to that by drafting some thought-provoking pieces around the subject. Below you will find a list of my articles, published so far (I will update it on a regular basis, so stop by!). However, as mentioned, aside from mine there are lots of other interesting articles, so do check out the platform Artlaw.online.

A list of my articles:

  • Mediation and Art: is it a match made in Heaven? – which examines whether mediation is the best way to solve art related disputes and whether mediation can help where litigation is consistently failing.
  • Yours might have been yours, but now it’s mine: Appropriation artists and the shady area of copyright – a thought-provoking piece on the issue of authorship. Do you think that it would be possible to take a photo of a famous photo and claim it as yours without even mentioning the original author? Or can you just take someone else’s work, incorporate it in yours and once again – omit the original author? If you think “hell, no!” on both counts, think again, or better – read my article.
  • So who’s the author? – where I pose a whole range of questions about defining an author for the purpose of copyright. It is not that straightforward, as frequently an artist for example comes up with an idea, yet it is not him, but a craftsman who realizes that idea… In such circumstances, who is then the author?
  • Your Lautrec or Lautrec’s Lautrec? – which will be especially interesting if you plan on investing in a painting and want to know the difference between “by studio of Rembrandt” and “by circle of Rembrandt”. I talk about attribution and authentication: what is the difference and what is the process.

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