Tag Archives: coaching

What did I learn when I slowed down and why is it important?

Hustling is never productive.

This might sound somewhat too categorical for a starting sentence, yet it is what it is. If you hustle too much there is a big chance you won’t get far. Another important facet is that hustling is rarely combinable with enjoying. You simply don’t have time for that. Continue reading What did I learn when I slowed down and why is it important?

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When do we learn to give up?

Our 8 months old is now learning to climb onto stuff.

No, let’s start differently — she just learned how to stand up. In the beginning it meant falling 9 out of 10. After a week of diligent practice (and by diligent I mean DILIGENT), she successfully gets up 99 times out of 100. It was truly fascinating to observe her: when it didn’t work she was angry, she was groaning and crying and complaining, but never — NEVER! — did she stop. She didn’t stop her attempts of getting up, saying: “I tried, it didn’t work out, so it’s probably not for me.” She didn’t care about how many attempts she will need, she just had a goal — to stand up and grab a toy dinosaur of her brother. Some 20 attempts later the creature was bitten to “death”; she got him.

Observing our daughter made me wonder: when do we learn to give up? Continue reading When do we learn to give up?

Responsibility of greatness

The title of this post is “stolen” from an interview of Joe Rogan with Jon Jones (an American mixed martial artist). As Joe had it, responsibility of greatness comes with potential. It’s not about what you’ve done, but what you could have done. It is about your potential, about what’s in you. 

What immediately comes to my mind is also a phrase on which a famous life coach Marie Forleo always ends her show episodes: “Stay on your game and keep going for your dreams, because the world needs that special gift that only YOU have”.

So let’s briefly discuss this: the gifts or talents and the responsibility to deploy them. Continue reading Responsibility of greatness

The Inner Game of Tennis and Real Life

I have recently finished reading Timothy Gallwey’s “The Inner Game of Tennis”. As mentioned on Goodreads, it is: “a revolutionary program for overcoming the self-doubt, nervousness, and lapses of concentration that can keep a player from winning.” I am no tennis player. To be precise, I am no player at all, but a bit of golf now and then. Nevertheless, I found the book very relevant also for “games” outside the “court”.

While reading the book Continue reading The Inner Game of Tennis and Real Life